Please Help With My Sex Worker Music DREAMS this summer!!

Are you going to be in Washington DC for the International AIDS conference in July?? I am! Check out this video and help me make my big thinking no limit WHORE REVOLUTIONARY dreams this summer. I have 24 days to raise money for my goal. Every element is about spreading sex worker activism through MUSIC. I am getting ready for a big show in Santa Monica with Madison Young and Nina Hartley on July 20th. Even after I have done activism in LA for the last 6 years, I still feel like the city barely knows what sex worker rights culture (and it is a culture everywhere else but here) IS. Help me change that! If you believe that that is worth $7 PLEASE DONATE! Click on the link below to get to the indiegogo campaign. Every donation HELPS! Thank you so much!

International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers Event in Raleigh-Durham Chapel Hill

Thank you to the NC Harm Reduction Coalition and many others for making this happen. Sex Workers Without Borders is thrilled to be part of this important event in the Triangle. International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers, 2011
What: A discussion with special guest Jill Brenneman- child sex-trafficking survivor (and later, consenting adult sex worker), sexual assault crisis counselor, & advocate for harm reduction & sex work decriminalization with Sex Workers Without Borders

When: Saturday, December 17th, 2011 from 5-7 PM

Where: Internationalist Books & Community Center, 405 W Franklin St, Chapel Hill, NC 27516

Who

http://www.facebook.com/events/253967284662740/

http://sexworkerswithoutborders.org/category/swwb-events/

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-owh_aRRO92I/TuJJskxY2QI/AAAAAAAAAIc/0hrtvMys8Ak/s1600/umbrella-2_vectorized.jpg

Diversity, Privilege, Inclusion, and Related Topics…

Opponents of the sex workers’ justice movement have sometimes used the topic of privilege to discredit our movement, saying that we represent the most prestigious side of sex work and are thus oblivious to the non glamorous sides of the sex trade or industry.  Though they use this issue to try to discredit us,  some of the main leaders in the anti-sex work movement are also privileged in various ways.

Yet, the issue of privilege is not only used against us by opponents, but it is also a very contentious issue within our movement. Because the U.S. sex workers’ rights movement has traditionally consisted of largely White, indoor, non street-based sex workers who are often considered to be on the more elite side of sex work and middle to upper class, some within our movement have expressed concerns about this movement representing mainly a very privileged sector of sex work, with the most marginalized groups of sex workers being underrepresented.

This has led some within our movement who fit into the “privileged” category ( as it has been defined) to express feelings of being shunned or excluded and treated like their contributions and voices are unimportant amidst the attemps to include traditionally underrepresented groups.

Though I’m not trying to invalidate anybody’s feelings of exclusion or inclusion within our movement, I’m concerned that we’re moving too far to the opposite side of the spectrum, in which the terms such a “privilege, diversity, inclusion, ” etc. are treated like taboo topics and people who address valid concerns about these issues are perceived to be mega-PC types who are trying to make people feel bad about their privileges.

At our previous Desiree Alliance conference, there was a diversity workshop which was well attended. However, I feel that the support for this was mixed, in which some people seemed to take it very seriously, but some seemed to have the attitude that this is just another attempt to be ultra PC and that it gets in the way of our organizing and achieving practical goals.

I feel that addressing issues of diversity, privilege, and inclusion aren’t merely attempts to be PC, but essential to our movement. Sex workers are a diversity of people, so I see nothing wrong with active efforts to include various types of sex workers in our movement. Some groups of sex workers are highly represented, while many are underrepresented. Also, sometimes our privileges do shape how we organize, our values, and our experiences in ways we may often be unaware of.

That being said, it’s also essential to be be inclusive not only of underrepesented groups, but also of highly represented groups within our movement. Just because somebody is privileged in various ways (or is perceived to be) doesn’t make them unimportant to the movement nor should the time, energy, and resources they contribute be unappreciated.

People aren’t typically (if ever) totally privileged or totally unprivileged, but rather there are many types of privilege, so we’re often privlieged in some ways and not privilged in other ways, and of course, there are different degrees of privilege.

Call for Performers: San Francisco Sex Workers Film and Arts Festival Cabaret

During every Sex Worker Festival we have a cabaret variety show at SOMArts Gallery to showcase sex workers’ live performance. We prioritize a variety of media and encourage diverse participation and especially encourage street-based workers, trans, queer and sex workers of color.

We have a small stipend to pay performers, and are especially interested in showcasing performance artists who have not traditionally performed in the festival or other sex worker arts festivals in the past.

Each act will have a maximum 10 minutes, and performers are required to attend a dress rehearsal two weeks before opening night.

To submit your work, please send us the following:

-A short description of your performance

-Any videos, recordings, or photographs of your act (not required, but if you have any, that would help!)
-A brief explanation why you think your performance is suitable for the Sex Worker Film & Arts Festival

-Any tech, space, or equipment needs you have
Please send your info before May 1, 2011 (especially for promotional deadlines).

If interested in performing, please call 503-348-7666 or email sexworkerfest(at)gmail.com.

CALL TO ACTION: UGANDA: Government should break the chains of injustices against sexual minorities and lift decision to ban Sex Workers Human Rights workshop.

20 November 2010

On the 17th of November 2010 the State Minister for Ethics and Integrity Hon Nsaba Buturo called off a conference organized by Akina Mama wa Afrika a Pan African Women’s Non Governmental Organisation based in Kampala, Uganda. He did so by sending a strong worded letter to the Hotel General Manager giving “directives not to host a Prostitutes Conference run by Akina Mama wa Afrika and if they do so, will be abetting illegality in Uganda”. It should be noted that Akina Mama sent a letter to the Minister informing him about the details of the conference. He never responded to it, but instead, sent a threatening letter to the hotel management with the objective to suspend the meeting.

The Minister’s actions are in open contradiction to the constitution of Uganda which guarantees the Freedom of Assembly, Speech and non discrimination said Kasha Jacqueline Director of Freedom and Roam Uganda. Commercial sex workers constitute a minority group that has the right to assemble, share ideas and forge ways on how to protect themselves against violence, abuse and HIV/AIDS as well as empower themselves, as any other Ugandan citizen.

Stopping this conference repeats a known pattern, as in 2008 the same Minister also cancelled a scheduled conference organized by the same group and host organization. While many other groups can meet freely in Uganda without being stopped or harassed, commercial sex workers, who experience high levels of vulnerability, inequality and discrimination can not exercise their right to freedom of assembly and speech” “ This is an injustice, a violation of their political and civil rights as well as of the right to work of these young women” lamented FARUG Communications Manager.

The Ugandan Ministry of Health, as it is well known, has acknowledged that Commercial Sex Workers are among Most At Risk Populations (MARPs) and has included them as main partners of the National HIV/AIDS program, which is guided among others by the UNGASS guidelines. Therefore the actions preformed by Mr Buturo are at odds with the national policy guidelines and will evidently undermine the investments made by the Ministry of Health to prevent and treat groups and persons affected by HIV/AIDS.

It should also be noted that, since 2003, Uganda has received eight grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. As its known worldwide the Global Funds guidelines are also very clear to state that the various populations affected by HIV/AIDS should be part of the efforts to prevent and treat the pandemic and, not as it is happening in Uganda, be systematically brutalized by criminalization. As it has been analyzed by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health, Mr. Anand Grover in his report to the UN Human Rights Council in June 2010:

“Criminalization represents a barrier to participation and collective action, through the suppression of activities of civil society and individual advocates. The participation of sex workers in interventions has been shown to have significant benefits. Organizations representing sex workers took an early lead in attempting to slow the spread of HIV/AIDS, through the promotion of condom use, the development of AIDS education programs and inclusive research studies”

Stopping the conference being organized by Akina Mama was Afrika openly contradicts these recommendations and guidelines to fight against HIV/AIDS in Uganda.

We call on the Minister and Government of Uganda to apologies for the trouble his intervention has caused and reverse his absurd decision.

For more details contact:

Solome Nakaweesi on Email: snkimbugwe@gmail.com or call +256772463154
Kasha Jacqueline on Email: kasha@faruganda.org or call +256772463161

To support our call, send letters to:

Min of Ethics and Integrity. Hon Nsaba butruo
Email: info@dei.go.ug
Min of Internal Affairs.Hon Kirunda Kivejinja
Email: info@mia.go.ug or Tel +256 41 231 059
Min of Gender & Equal opportunity Commission. Hon Opio Gabriel
Email: ps@mglsd.go.ug or Tel +256-41-347854 Phone 2: +256-41-347855
Min of Health. Hon Stephen Malinga
Email: info@health.go.ug or Tel: +256 41340884
Uganda Human Rights Commission
Email:uhrc@uhcr.org or Tel +25641 34800718 or +256 41233757

You are not FREE until everyone is FREE
“BREAK THE CHAINS”

Desiree Alliance Conference Presentations Now Online

All of the keynote speaker presentations for this year’s Desiree Alliance Conference are now live and available for viewing on the Desiree website. Included are Dr. Joycelyn Elders, Women with a Vision’s Deon Haywood, ISWFACE’s Norma Jean Almodovar, Kirk Read, SWOP-USA’s Robyn Few, Tim Barnett, and Nina Hartley.

2010 Keynote Speeches

Desiree Alliance 2.0

Since this year’s conference is going to be a week-long event, I know that many sex workers/conference attendees will be Tweeting/blogging/whatevering about their time in Las Vegas. For those who want to follow what’s going on from their own computer, I encourage everyone who is attending DA and publicizing it to add their names and links in the Comments section below.