How to Be an Ally to Sex Workers

  “How to Be an Ally to Sex Workers” by SWOP-Chicago

1) Don’t Assume. Don’t assume you know why a person is in the sex industry. We’re not all trafficked or victims of abuse. Some people make a choice to enter this industry because they enjoy it, others may be struggling for money and have less of a choice.

2) Be Discreet and respect personal boundaries. If you know a sex worker, it’s OK to engage in conversation in dialogue with them in private, but respect their privacy surrounding their work in public settings.  Don’t ask personal questions such as “does your family know what you do?” If a sex worker is not “out” to their friends, family, or co-workers, it’s not your place to tell everyone what they do.

3) Don’t Judge. Know your own prejudices and realize that not everyone shares the same opinions as you. Whether you think sex work is a dangerous and exploitative profession or not is irrelevant compared to the actual experiences of the person who works in the industry. It’s not your place to pass judgment on how another person earns the money they need to survive.

4) Watch You Language. Cracking jokes or using derogatory terms such as “hooker”, “whore”, “slut”, or “ho” is not acceptable. While some sex workers have “taken back” these words and use them among themselves, they are usually used to demean sex workers when spoken by outsiders.

5) Address Your Bias Against Sex Workers. If you have a underlying fear that all sex workers are bad people and full of diseases, then perhaps these are issues within yourself that you need to address.  In fact, the majority of sex workers practice safer sex than their peers and get tested regularly.

6) Don’t Play Rescuer. Not all sex workers are trying to get out of the industry or in need of help. Ask them what they need, but not everyone is looking for “Captain Save-A-Ho” or the “Pretty Woman” ending.

7) If you are a client or patron of sex workers, be respectful of boundaries. You’re buying a service, not a person. Don’t ask for real names, call at all hours of the day/night, or think that your favorite sex worker is going to enter into a relationship with you off the clock.

8) Do Your Own Research. Most mainstream media is biased against sex workers and the statistics you read in the news about the sex industry are usually inaccurate. Be critical of what you read or hear and educate yourself on who exactly is transmitting diseases or being trafficked.

9) Respect that Sex Work is Real Work. There’s a set of professional skills involved and it’s not necessarily an industry that everyone can enter into. Don’t tell someone to get a “real job” when they already have one that suits them just fine.

10) Just because someone is a sex worker doesn’t mean they will have sex with you. No matter what are of the sex industry that someone works in, don’t assume that they are horny and willing to have sex with anyone at any time.

11) Be Supportive and Share Resources. If you know of someone who is new to the industry or in an abusive situation with an employer, by all means offer advice and support without being condescending. Some people do enter into the sex industry without educating themselves about what they are getting into and may need help. Despite the situation, calling the police is usually never a good option. Try to find other organizations that are sensitive to the needs of sex workers by contacting the organizations listed below.

12) As you learn the above things, stand up for sex workers when conversations happen.  Share your personal stories if you so choose.  Don’t let the stigma, bigotry and shame around sex work continue.  Remember it’s important that sex workers be allowed to speak for themselves and for allies to not speak for sex workers but to speak with sex workers.

Realize that sex work transcends ‘visible’ notions of race, gender, class, sexuality, education, and identities; sex workers are your sisters, brothers, mothers, fathers, lovers, and friends. Respect them!

Get Active! Contact your local SWOP Chapter to find out what you can do or form your own in the city you live in.

This list was composed by the members and allies of Sex Workers Outreach Project-Chicago. Visit us on the web at www.swop-chicago. org

Other Resources-

www.swop-usa. org
www.desireealliance .org
www.boundnotgagged. com

11 Responses

  1. This is brilliant!!

  2. Excellent list!! I hope lots of people read and learn from this.

  3. Thank you for this list; it’s very useful and educational for a new ally like myself.

    Question: I’d like to get more involved with sex worker rights. However, I myself am not a sex worker, and over here (in Australia) almost all the jobs/volunteer opps are open only to sex workers. How else can I, as a non-sex worker, get involved?

  4. Susan mentioned the typo in number 10…if you repost this, fix that! Also we’ve all had problems with the WYSIWYG editor changing Number 8 to an emoticon. Don’t know why it’s doing that.

  5. For number 8 it’s changing to an emoticon because of the ) next to the 8. Probably 8) will cause the “hot smiley” to be shown by 8 ) will not.

  6. The typo in #10 is fixed. I can go back in and edit this post on BNG since I was the person who started the thread, so if anybody sees anything else to fix, please let me know and I’ll edit again.

  7. The weird thing is that when I went into edit this post on BNG, the emoticon doesn’t show up. It just shows the number 8, which it should. However, on the public board, the emoticon does show up. I’m not sure why this happens.

  8. If you want to be my alli then make sure you always put my worker voice first.

    Unionize now.

  9. […] is an important list that everyone should read. Reposting from Bound, Not Gagged. — “How to Be an Ally to Sex Workers” by […]

  10. […] How to Be an Ally to Sex Workers « Bound, Not Gagged VERY important list!! (tags: sexwork sexworkersrights humanrights allies important reference activism) […]

  11. I support sex workers whenever I can scrape together the donation, honest. For those of you across the internet who are logging on here to exercise your high horse here’s this. Sex workers have been kind and decent to me when my ex-wife wasn’t able to. What they are kind about is my crippling chronic pain condition that makes civilian dating a total no-go. If a man can’t pain for it he’s never getting any for free. The only difference from my wheelchair is that sex workers will provide where civilian women get snotty at any reminder that I’m still functionally a man,.

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