Yes on K Supporters At City Hall

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This is the image I’m gonna remember this fight by. And it’s not done yet. Not hardly. What’s our plan next, San Francisco?

11 Responses

  1. I’m disappointed in San Francisco for rejecting Prop K. I myself had concerns about how this measure would have played out, but I voted yes because it had such great potential to make things better for sex workers.

    I just want to leave a note here to say I’m very grateful to the sex worker activists who worked so hard on this. People like me, who are still too afraid to put our names and faces on the way we make our stigmatized (and still illegal) living, let alone come out about it in a political campaign, owe you a serious debt of gratitude for putting your own names and faces to sex worker issues, going out there and facing down all the ignorant crap about WHORES, showing people the truth and generally trying to make things better for all of us. You did not fail! People are now that much more aware of the issues facing sex workers and how sex workers themselves think their problems should be solved. Forty-two percent of San Francisco did vote yes, and that is not exactly a tiny minority. What activists tried to do here has probably already inspired sex workers elsewhere to come up with their own solutions, bringing even more awareness to our issues.

    Thank you!

  2. Every single person I spoke with who opposed this measure was against it because they felt it allowed streetwalkers to operate unabated, and they didn’t want that in their neighborhood.

    If someone can construct a proposal similar to the way Rhode Island’s law exists, where prostitution is legal inside residences, and perhaps allows brothels (in other words, doesn’t continue to allow streetwalking), then it would pass easily I believe.

    I know that runs counter to much of what this was intended to address, but the simple fact of the matter is that many people don’t want streetwalkers parading through their neighborhoods, and until we accept that and address it in some way, prostitution is not going to be decriminalized. That’s just a simple fact.

    I don’t think it would be too hard to construct some kind of proposal that prevents the police from arresting streetwalkers, but doesn’t explicitly allow it to continue unabated.

  3. This is unfortunate. I had high hopes for Props K and 8.

  4. I just wanted to express that I so respect, cherish and honor all the work that everyone did fighting for social change on Prop K! Thank you so much from the bottom of my heart!

  5. San Francisco sex workers and their allies did a great job. As was said above 42% is NOT a tiny minority by any stretch.

    42% is enough to continue to build on, and this is your chance to get out there and truly educate San Franciscans about sex work and sex worker concerns. I am willing to contribute whatever money I can to this effort all the way from New York.

    Susan

  6. The results are incredible! Maybe I’m being Pollyanna, but I don’t see this as a defeat, they merely had higher numbers.

    ESPU, SWOP-USA, SWOP-NORCAL and so many individuals did such an amazing job against huge obstacles — not the least was the local media’s bias toward the anti-trafficking propaganda.

    Sex workers are a political force. May this be the start of an era of change for all of us!

    XX

  7. US Prostitutes Collective also worked very hard and was part of the Yes on Prop K coalition.

    It is our job to fight for those most vulnerable in our industry. Those who most suffer under criminlaization are street based workers, immigrant workers, transgender workers and workers of color.

    Kamala Harris makes the arguement that people in poor neighborhoods where street prostitution takes place, want criminalization to contiue because people in poor neighborhoods need protection from the crime that street prostitution brings with it. Having lived in the poor neighborhoods where prostitution takes place and having been a street prostitute myself, I can say with complete confidence that poor people know what the real cause of street prostitution is, it is poverty . Poor people want real solutions to the crime of poverty, such as jobs, education, healthcare and housing.

    I fully support Maxine Doogan for including street based workers and immigrant workers in Prop K and all the sex workers rights organizations who worked so hard to make ceratin all sex industry workers have the same protections, regardless of where they work or the immigration status.

    Lisa Roellig

  8. On another positive note, Prop. K received a higher percentage of “yes” votes -42%- than Measure Q (Berkeley decriminalization initiative) did in 2004 with 37% of votes were in favor. This is a sign of progress and I think a similiar initiative can pass in the next election if we fix up some of the wording for clarity purposes so people will better understand the initiative and to make it harder for the anti’s to (probably intentionally) misinterpret the initiative to promote their own agenda.

  9. I was hoping for Prop K to pass, but 42% is nothing to sneeze at. With more clarity and more media and organization, it could happen next time around. Activists on Prop K did an amazing, amazing job, and got people talking. NIMBY-ism is a huge obstacle.

  10. @Lisa: “Having lived in the poor neighborhoods where prostitution takes place and having been a street prostitute myself, I can say with complete confidence that poor people know what the real cause of street prostitution is, it is poverty . Poor people want real solutions to the crime of poverty, such as jobs, education, healthcare and housing.”

    No shit! Gah!

    But yeah, 42% is awesome. It is very, very good. Great work out there! I’m so proud of all of you and all of us!

  11. Posting as anon for a second. I predicted this months ago. People will not accept prostitution legislation written by a pimp, even in San Francisco.

    IF we can get together and organize a simple ballot measure to end the arrests of sex workers, that would pass in a minute. But the language of Prop K left giant loopholes for pimps and traffickers. People also didn’t like the direct attack on SAGE which is very popular among all types of people including community organizers and working sex workers.

    Next time let’s keep it simple and be thoughtful about the choice of spokespeople.

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