League of Young Voters Guide: Tell Them What You Think of Prop K

I’m getting ready to go vote and checking the League of Young Voters’ guide for assistance on the monstrous amount of city and state propositions, of which K is just one. Here’s what sad: the League couldn’t make an endorsement on Prop K. I left the following comment on the League’s ballot guide at the encouragement of SF queer porn star Jiz Lee:

Prop K would not remove any laws against human trafficking, or prevent their enforcement. SF police would still be able to enforce existing laws against rape, torture, kidnapping, and human trafficking. If prostitution laws allow cops to rescue victims of human trafficking, then why have they not been able to prosecute any cases of trafficking in SF? The current system does not work. The true use of laws against prostitution is to arrest San Francisco’s most vulnerable people — drug users, the homeless and marginally housed, women of color and especially transgender women of color, and young people. It makes no sense that those who can support voluntary drug treatment programs and who resist the expansion of the criminal justice system by locking up yet more people for nonviolent offenses could also support jailing sex workers in the guise of ending human trafficking. In the sex trade, only human rights will stop the wrongs.

That’s right — there’s city and state propositions on the ballot to increase public funding for drug treatment programs, to preserve the civil rights of parolees and jailed immigrants, and to stop prison development. The League is taking a stand for all of these, not to mention in favor of the civil right to marry regardless of gender or sexual orientation, but not on Prop K. It’s sad, but it only goes to show how far we still have to come in working in solidarity with social justice movements.

Really, white slavery, again?

What do you think “girls in the Midwest” is code for in this statement to KCBS by SAGE’s Norma Hotaling?

“When you say yes to Proposition K you’re going to have girls in the Midwest recruited by slave owners and brought to San Francisco.”

Hotaling also calls an unnamed Tenderloin massage parlor a “slave camp.”

SFist Poll and Comments on Prop K — weigh in?

Local San Francisco blog SFist asks how you’re voting on Prop K. Throw some comments their way?

Suggestions?

There’s a lot of misinformation out there about how Prop K would prevent law enforcement from investigating human trafficking, which would remain just as illegal as it is under Federal law.

Zoning issues keep coming up, too. What’s frustrating is that there’s so little consensus locally, nationally, or internationally on how to regulate prostitution, yet there’s almost universal agreement that some zoning regulations on where businesses can be located and advertise are important. But these wouldn’t be part of the criminal code, and stipulating them in a ballot proposition could be too complex to ask voters to deal with. Still, all the language around “plying their trade” is dehumanizing, and needs a response.

Final Election Results on Prop K

Okay, this is going out to all you tech-savvy chicks.   What’s the best way those of us not living in San Fran can find out the final results on Prop K as quickly as possible?   I’m just wondering if there was an alternative to constantly checking the BNG blog.

Prop K News Nov 3rd, 2008

San Francisco Prostitutes, Mayor Clash on Vote to Stop Arrests

Nov. 3 (Bloomberg) — San Francisco may become the first major U.S. city to decriminalize prostitution.

Voters will decide tomorrow on a ballot measure that would stop police from enforcing laws against sex workers and eliminate funding for anti-prostitution programs. The measure, known as Proposition K, may pass, said District Attorney Kamala Harris. She opposes it, as does Mayor Gavin Newsom.

Prostitution on the ballot – Proposition K up for vote in San Francisco


Regulation of what is described as the world’s oldest profession is among the numerous issues that tomorrow’s election will decide. Passage of Proposition K in San Francisco would prohibit the police from investigating a complaint of prostitution or arresting or prosecuting anyone for that activity. An article in the Oct. 6. 2008, edition of the San Francisco Chronicle provided the details on which I am basing this analysis.