TODAY! Meditation remembrance for the DC Madame…and keeping it together.

Hey lovers,

Deborah Jeane Palfrey.  I can’t stop thinking about her. Her death cut me deeper than I ever could have imagined.

Her death has been heavy on the hearts of many a sex worker, indicative as it is of this juggernaut of a system that could grind us into nothing if we get caught up.  For me, I think her death translates into real fear.  A fear that is about fighting the good fight, and still going down.  If we manage to survive and thrive in a crazy industry; if we live ethically as sex workers and use all our faculties to operate our businesses and maintain what we believe is right, we still might end up dead.  Ms. Palfrey was a resourceful woman.  A woman connected, perhaps dangerously, to big players in the government.  And she got royally fucked. Someone, somewhere said, we’re going to bring her down.  We’re going to make an example of this one.  And they didn’t stop until she was swinging from a rope.

“Upon news of her death there was no shortage of those who suggested Jeane Palfrey had been killed by cloaked enemies in the government. They miss the point.

Jeane Palfrey of course had been killed by her government. She’d been unfairly ground down and hounded to death by shameless prosecutors and disinterested robed judges in our judicial branch.”

(Bill Keisling, Yardbirds.com )

I regret deeply now that I, we, did not do something more concrete to support her in her struggle.  It is a bare and unpleasant truth that the moment a sex worker comes under legal fire, s/he becomes untouchable.  Abandoned by clients, friends, etc…how did Palfrey end up in her mother’s home?  Why wasn’t she staying with me?  Where were her friends?  Where was her support network?

This blog was begun as a response to her original arrest.  She has, inadvertently, been an enormous catalyst in the sex workers rights movement.  And now she’s dead.

What the fuck.

There will be no procession, fanfare, or jazz funeral for the DC Madame.  Ain’t no crying in the streets for her, except by us, invisibly.  But I want to hold her up in this moment.

All the friends in Barcelona right now, doing the good work at the International harm reduction assoc. conference are making me remember that we are making progress.  Lateral steps toward a more just system.  And I want to thank Deborah Jeane Palfrey for her part in that.  As a contentious figure, a frustrating spin doctor, or a hero.   Whichever.

So today, beginning at midnight GMT (6pm Central, 4pm Pacific) for 24 hours we’re holding a conscious meditation, vigil, or remembrance of Ms. Deborah Jeane.  Light a candle, say some words, or sit in silent meditation with us.  We’ll be sitting for 1 hour at midnight pacific time (8am GMT) and consciously holding her, and what her death means for all of us,  in our thoughts all day.

Please join us!

thinking of you, with love and respect.

Surgeon and Faffs the Jackal

23 Responses

  1. Thank you Surgeon and Faffs for this post. I’ve just returned to our apt building in Barcelona and I am going to alert everybody to the vigil. We’ll get together in one of the apartments tonight and just be together for a while.

    We’ve had such a struggle within the harm reduction framework. Historically, sex workers have been treated as a ‘problem’ that needs to be addressed in order to reduce harm in terms of infection, disease, drug-use, etc. We’ve worked hard and this is the second year that we have visible SW representation that is calling on the world harm reduction community to recognize that the laws that criminalize us, alienate us and grind us down ARE the real harm that we endure, feeding into the other potential hazards.

    “Abandoned by clients, friends, etc…how did Palfrey end up in her mother’s home? Why wasn’t she staying with me? Where were her friends? Where was her support network?”

    This is killing me too. Couldn’t we have done more? We asked ourselves these same questions when Brandy Britton was found murdered. Can’t we protect each other? Can’t we remind each other that we’re here, we support each other. That this isn’t just about our political goals and aspirations, this isn’t just about strategic media opportunities and leverage. This is about making sure that every individual sex worker knows that we are here, we will fight.

    I don’t know that we really could have done more for either of them. As much as we wanted to support them, they were hesitant to engage with an ‘organized’ movement in some ways. Melissa communicated with Deborah Jeane, others communicated with Brandy Britton. They were both terrified. They both expressed fear that something terrible was going to happen to them and opted to distance themselves in some ways, while embracing opportunities for blog interviews in a more traditional sense (Radical Vixen, Susie Bright, etc)

    Many other sex workers are afraid. They’re afraid that people in their lives (boyfriends, parents, friends, professors, etc) will find out that they are sex workers. They’re afraid that engaging in activism will automatically ‘out’ them or make them more visible to law enforcement. I think the system depends on this fear, it perpetuates the cycle of isolation that grinds us down until we’re invisible. It kills us. How are we going to address the very legitimate fear that so many of us have?

    jonolan’s totally ignorant, bigoted comment exemplifies why sex workers desperately need community in order to keep each other safe. jonolan is the epitome of what killed Deborah Jeane Palfrey and her death is on the hands of those who think that way.

  2. WAIT A MINUTE! Deborah Jean Palfrey’s story is sad, but she was a PIMP NOT A SEX WORKER!

    Lots of us have major problems with pimps, yes even the ones who run nice tidy escort agencies.

    Does the definition of sex worker now include pimps? I was thinking the women on this board were sex workers (except for Maxine Doogan). Honestly how many here are pimps? THERE IS A BIG DIFFERENCE between sending someone out to do a blow job and doing the blow job yourself. It’s not the same AT ALL!!!!

    What the hell???!!!

  3. […] This post at Bound, Not Gagged really touched me. Her death has been heavy on the hearts of many a sex worker, indicative as it is of this juggernaut of a system that could grind us into nothing if we get caught up. For me, I think her death translates into real fear. A fear that is about fighting the good fight, and still going down. If we manage to survive and thrive in a crazy industry; if we live ethically as sex workers and use all our faculties to operate our businesses and maintain what we believe is right, we still might end up dead. Ms. Palfrey was a resourceful woman. A woman connected, perhaps dangerously, to big players in the government. And she got royally fucked. Someone, somewhere said, we’re going to bring her down. We’re going to make an example of this one. And they didn’t stop until she was swinging from a rope. […]

  4. to jonolan: I’m sitting here with a whore from Australia who is not a criminal. What does crime have to do with an individual’s right to be safe and not dead? I don’t know who the fuck you are, or why you have nothing better to do than harass us at a time when we are mourning, but you have officially earned yourself the status of being the first commenter ever banned from this blog. Violence will not be accepted here.

  5. Word, Stacey.

    In the conversation I had with Deborah Jeane and one with her attorney, I felt this huge divide — like if we activists became associated w/ her case, that we could become a liability to her. There was no way to cross it. I wanted to go to DC for the trial, to make a connection there, but then the trial was over almost before it began. It was all too late.

    What’s going to make a difference in the future is for the working girls of agencies like Pamela Martin and the madams who run them to, before investigations and arrests and charges and trials, to have a meaningful support network. By the time the Fed is involved, it’s too late and too much. We need to think about who out there right now is vulnerable, who out there needs to plug into a community — not just through political advocacy, but socially because god feeling alone only makes this worse. It’s in our having each other that we’re stronger, and even that is criminal to some people. Not that we’re proud, or speaking out, but that we know we are not alone.

    No one can ever say we don’t exist now. But what next?

    Lighting my own little torch here. Love from San Francisco.

  6. First, not that this really needs a reply, but to waitaminute…you really think Palfrey became a madame without working?

    second, I heart you guys.

    xo,
    surgeon

  7. In the conversation I had with Deborah Jeane and one with her attorney, I felt this huge divide — like if we activists became associated w/ her case, that we could become a liability to her. There was no way to cross it.

    It’s tough isn’t it… like being stuck between a rock and a hard place, because given what the current climate is, the best way to support her was to not associate with her. But that sucks, and isn’t really any support at all.

  8. Right on, Surgeon. I’ll be participating in the meditation tonight. I’m going to make a personal pledge to recommit myself to outreach, and encourage others to do the same.

    I’m going to reexamine my relationship with that which may keep me from reaching out to ANY sex worker in need. In Deborah Jeane’s case, I was intimidated by the invisible, gelatinous wall that separates me from anyone who’s the focus of media attention. Jesus, Deborah Jeane was at the end of the day, a girl just like me, separated by nothing more than geography.

    Regardless of her unwillingness to be a poster child for the sex worker rights movement, if that’s accurate, I suspect she would have appreciated the gesture of outreach had I personally extended it, even if she felt compelled to reject it for the purposes of self-preservation.

    IF ANYONE, AT ANYTIME, ever needs a sanctuary to retreat to, contact me. My email is my blog name at gmail. I live in Tucson, Arizona on a hilltop surrounded by desert and close to downtown. If you need to take a break from the madness, there’s always room. If you don’t know who I am, I can give you references (haha) from other bloggers on this site.

    Love & Solidarity,
    Miz Viv

  9. For waitaminute…from a capitalist perspective madams (good, skilled, fair sex service biz entrepenuers) should be as respected as Steve Jobs.

    From an anti-capitalist perspective, I would be more critical but, in this economic context there should be positive business models for organizing around sex services. Everywhere needs positive organization models, but that’s called pimping according to the laws here.

    DMSC, India, has a credit union.
    http://www.durbar.org/index.html

    It will take quite a bit of organizing and evolution to get there in my country… I wonder how this has developed in places where sex work businesses are legal…

  10. Sex is still a topic that brings condescension and dismissal, ala today’s NY TIMES review of a book about Joni Mitchell, Carol King and Carly Simon that says how naive the boomer generation was for believing that loving sexual relationships could be a goal in themselves. So it’s no surprise that sex workers will bear the same dismissive and condescending attitude on a good day that these singers are getting from the “newpaper of record.”

  11. waitaminute, on May 12th, 2008 at 1:58 pm Said:

    WAIT A MINUTE! Deborah Jean Palfrey’s story is sad, but she was a PIMP NOT A SEX WORKER!

    First of all, a pimp is simply a manager of a prostitute. It doesn’t matter what gender – male, female, or trans. It doesn’t even matter what sexuality you are too – straight, bi, gay, etc.

    She was a pimp in the sense that she provided a market for clients to meet with “fantasy” dates. While I think she emphasized that to protect her legally, obfuscation is necessary when your freedom is being hindered.

    Prostitution is the world’s oldest profession yet it is one of the least respected professions. It goes back even to the bible days. The story of Tamar and Judah is one of my favorite examples in Genesis chapter 38. Tamar was a smart ho because she obfuscated herself and kept a token that would be used later to foil the hypocrisy of her uncle. If Palfrey had some bargaining chips it could have foiled the plans of the people in power that wanted her whacked.

    I respect Palfrey’s work. Pimping gets such a bad rap because of what the media portrays in movies, videos, and songs. There’s so many misconceptions of pimping, but the good news is that there are people that are trying to bring it out in the open. The Hughes brothers did a documentary American Pimp which interviews mostly black street pimps. It was done very well and even went into the history of pimping and interviewed a retired pimps and active ones as well. The Heidi Fleiss story was another one that got out in the open. I respect the madam for being starting out as a prostitute and giving herself a promotion into pimping. She ran her game tight until her ego and drug habit got in the way of her business. To this day she’s still trying to get her Stud Farm brothel (males servicing only females), but she’s had more personal problems and legal wranglings.

    In my view a respectful pimp is one that does a good job in managing prostitutes, respects their sex workers when they have self-respect, provides safety, counseling, and other services that a sex worker is unable to do.

    Pimping is all around us. A manager of a strip club can be considered a pimp. If a dancer does not follow house rule or doesn’t obey a manager, then they can have their employment terminated. Most female dancers I knew hopped around different clubs when a mananger because abusive or didn’t like how they were treated.

    In another sense the squares that go along with their square jobs have pimps. If you go to your office job and your boss doesn’t like that you are tardy, he can fire you. As one pimp put it: pimps do what they want, hos do what they are told.

    Lots of us have major problems with pimps, yes even the ones who run nice tidy escort agencies.

    What’s the problem you have with pimps? From all I hear, Palfrey was a nice, well dressed, well educated lady that did her job well. Even in the Alex Jones interviews, Alex praised her character.

    Does the definition of sex worker now include pimps? I was thinking the women on this board were sex workers (except for Maxine Doogan).

    Pimps are in the same business as sex workers. A sex worker is the service provider, and the pimp is the manager. A prostitute can be her own pimp if she can manage her own money and take care of herself. In fact I met a transexual escort that had all her shit together. She was smart and resourceful and built her lifestyle all by herself. To me that is pimping.

    Honestly how many here are pimps?

    Right here. I’m a prostitute and a pimp. I can play both roles…well now I said I’m in retirement, but I said that before and just like Michael Corleone in Godfather 3: Just when I thought I was out… they pull me back in.🙂

    THERE IS A BIG DIFFERENCE between sending someone out to do a blow job and doing the blow job yourself. It’s not the same AT ALL!!!!

    What the hell???!!!

    The issues here is: Is the sex worker doing the work out of her own will? Is the pimp manipulating her mind in such a way that degrades her own free will to do that job? Actually there are so many different issues that can be brought up from all this.

    I can do both – send someone to do the work or do it myself. You see that’s one advantage of being bisexual.🙂

    Also for further study, someone uploaded the American Pimp documentary on Youtube. It’s well worth your time to watch it, and will dispel some of the misconceptions of a pimp. And even then you aren’t getting the whole picture unless you’ve been in the game and tried it yourself.

    American Pimp Outakes: Interview with Bradley Honorable

    American Pimp: 1 of 9 (Hughes brothers documentary featuring retired pimp Rosebud, legendary pimp Filmore Slim, and much more)

    American Pimp underground & bootlegs – The General and Biship Don Magic Juan

    Andre L. Taylor on The Montel Williams Show (retired pimp turned life coach)

    I believe that we should be reaching out to our pimps (the good ones that respect our common goals) as well.

    Keeping it real!

  12. “In another sense the squares that go along with their square jobs have pimps. If you go to your office job and your boss doesn’t like that you are tardy, he can fire you. As one pimp put it: pimps do what they want, hos do what they are told.”

    Pimps should never do what they want, when they want to. That’s called abuse. And you shouldn’t be glamorizing that.

  13. So that’s how it is here. I always wondered how many people on this web site were really pimps doint all the posting about the happy future with rights for all independent sex workers. The picture you all were painting was too rosy and just didn’t match real life.

    I don’t need to watch a video to learn about pimping I got a whole life of learning about it thank you.

    So what do you “nice” pimps think should be done about the “mean” pimps. Or do you even care? How do you really feel about independent sex workers? Are we a threat? Are we just being strung along on this web site?

  14. The language around ‘pimps’ is salacious. Of course that’s what readers such as ‘Sal’ are drawn to.

    There are far more independent workers here than any other kind. Just because a few people have utilized this board to beat their chests does not mean that you can label all of us.

    The legal definition of ‘pimping’ is far too broad to be able to draw a clear distinction between those who may abuse people and those who are doing us a service.

    It is the criminalized system that keeps independent workers silenced.

    When the those who criticize us or this site are brave enough to post with a real name and real links back to their own work, we’ll start to take you seriously. Right now, you all look like a bunch of bored cowards with nothing better to do than harass a vulnerable group of people.

  15. In labor organizing we talk about workers having control at the point of production and distribution.
    Workers collect the money at the point of production and distribute it to our support staff, our children, our landlords, the dry cleaners, even my dog benefits from my work.

    For workers who rely on agents to collect moneys for them, as in the case of agents who provided that service to the workers who set up the Spitzer deal, and there is a dispute over the disbursement, what is the worker to do? Typically, we don’t do anymore business with that agent. Some steel in advanced antisipation of this. We can file in a claim in court (with the risk of retaliation), we can make a report at the local wage and hour commissions and get the money back that way as has many a dance club worker. We tell other workers, if we meet them. But generally we don’t have much recourse as is the case for the average worker who is considered an employee.

    In traditional labor organizing, the factory workers for example, don’t collect the money; therefore have little effect in how it’s distributed. The worker gets whatever wages the collector of the money says and keeps the rest. If there is a dispute, workers can organize and then force the collector to hand over the books and then make demands about what portions of the proceeds they want and how they want it, (benefits, healthcare, pensions). A contract is written and negotiated and enforcement clauses are included. If the collector of the money doesn’t agree, or doesn’t follow through with the contract or negotiates in bad faith, the workers have recourse clauses in the contract that are backed by labor laws. Right now in the USA, the labor laws highly favor the employer over the employee. So when we look at exploitation in the sex industry, we have look at our selves in the context of what’s going on for workers locally and globally. Very important that we do this. The profiteers of prostitution, (the feminist) have been effective in using the globalization of the workforce in creating the ‘trafficking myth’ as further justification to keep us all criminal. The rescue industry is about economics.

    In our industry, as providers of direct services, we have all the power. We have more power than the average worker on the planet. We can put our money were we want. We need to be putting our money towards having a collective political voice.

    And that’s what they are afraid of. That’s why were criminalized. Feminist of the turn of the last century were fighting for their political voice and they saw us as their rivals, a threat. They knew that men were the collectors of the money and the power (which is why and how they became married to them in the first place) so the men were the goal and target. So they demonized the male associates of prostitutes because at that time, women couldn’t even own property without being associated with a man, you could travel alone, and you could do anything without a man at that time. Demonizing men as exploiters of prostitutes was a strategic move by the progressives and suffragists. They set up the ‘rescue nation’ to hide and justify their role in oppressing us as they still do today. But they didn’t have our permission. They didn’t have our buy in, as we say in labor organizing. The all male legislators at the time went along with it because whom you had sex with was always leverage for something for somebody. So now we’re used as political footballs for who ever wants to use us. We hold the keys to our own freedom through solidarity industrial global union organizing.

    Gotta go walk my pimp, oops, I mean my dog.

  16. stacey wrote: “When the those who criticize us or this site are brave enough to post with a real name and real links back to their own work, we’ll start to take you seriously.”

    Any independent sex worker in the Bay Area would be insane to come out against Maxine Doogan in public. She is vicious and vindictive. As are all pimps.

    I think you start thinking differently when you pimp. You can’t afford to care about people’s feelings about what they are doing. You need them to stay in the business maybe even when it is time for them to leave. You recruit borderline people because of the upside profit potential. You have to be meaner to make it clear you are the boss and other pimps better stay away from your stable. Pimping attracks mean and violent people, but I think it also turns people mean and violent who wouldn’t necessarily be that way.

    The idea that pimps are sex workers denigrates the work of real sex workers. Pimps are parasites. They are certainly not “support staff”. The idea that I should work for Maxine’s vision of a pimp run erotic union is laughable.

    Take a look at what is really happening with decrim in Australia/NZ – not the public relations tour that blew through town. The pimps there are thriving, violent, organized, territorial, and wreaking havoc on independent workers.

    Pimps are not our friends.

  17. aquav,

    Your alter-ego posted sweeping generalizations about participants at Bound Not Gagged based on your opinion of one individual who comments here. Workers shouldn’t have to out themselves for any reason, it’s quite easy to throw around accusations about an entire group of people when you are anonymous and we can become careless about how our posts affect others.

    There are many, many voices here, including yours. Which means that the next person who comments about how we’re all just a bunch of ‘pimps’ (and we’re not) or any other stereotype they will be including you, and your point of view will be dismissed.

    I’m asking you and other commenters to be conscious of this. Thoughtful debate and disagreement is always welcome here.

    Have you actually talked to anybody who lives/works in Australia? It can’t be denied that they exerience their far share of problems (and only one state, New South Wales, is decriminalized, others are legal or quasi-legal, with national legal guidelines) The areas where the problems you mention thrive are in the police-controlled sectors of the industry. Without criminal concerns, it is not as easy to coerce workers. If you’re claiming that you are an independent worker, which I think you said in your last post, but perhaps I misunderstand, having a look at the many different models in AU and New Zealand might be a helpful way for you to identify exactly what you think would work best for you and communicate that to us here. Or not.

    Please don’t be dismissive of the many different people, mostly indy workers, who are able to utilize this blog to (sometimes anonymously) make their voices heard on media and policy issues that matter to them.

  18. Just saying, as a worker and as an activist, I’ve come out against Maxine Doogan’s strategies in public — like on this blog, just search, and also in person — and I’m still here, still standing.

    I’ll also defend her right and the rights of those who have worked as management in the sex industry. Now in my experience as a worker, who has had good management and poor, has been part of management myself within the context of a worker-owned co-operative, and as a union organizer who participated in negotiating contracts between workers and owners in the sex industry, I’ve seen both strong and weak management styles, and effective and poor communication styles. The good, the bad, and the very infight-driven ugly. As disheartened as I was by my experience within a unionized sex business, I fought to the teeth for the right of that union to exist and for the workers to maintain it. What makes for strong, organized workers in the sex industry is buy-in from both the workers and from management. Management need a seat at the table. Call them pimps, call them owners, call them daddy — they need to be a part of the conversation. How and on what terms, I don’t know. Management in the sex industry have disproportionately held the power over working conditions, which is where the anger over pimping, when the moralizing language is removed from the conversation, seems to be coming from. And few sex workers would dispute that. For too long too many workers have had to rely on management.

    What’s really going on here, as someone who’s watched the blog authorship grow (and has had a hand in approving and inviting new authors, though that’s done collectively), is that independent workers, who have previously been very isolated, are finding a voice to talk about the sex business. If anything, this blog heavily foregrounds the voices of workers who do not work with any type of outside management, and may never have. Of course, we’re still reliant on third party businesses to maintain our own: cell phone companies, escort directory websites, apartment managers, internet service providers, even the laundry (and the publishers of The Economist, without which I’d never have been able to keep up with the news when I was traveling for work a lot). Are those service providers our pimps, too? If we give them a cut of earnings for what they provide us? No, because it’s clear there’s shared power there, tit for tat with clear boundaries defensible by law. What’s oppressive about pimping is criminalization — when workers have no recourse under the law, or are intimidated into silence for fear of reprisal not from a pimp but from law enforcement.

    All that said, bless Deborah Jeane on her way, and let’s have this labor conversation in another post, please.

  19. Susan, on May 13th, 2008 at 8:14 pm Said:

    Pimps should never do what they want, when they want to. That’s called abuse. And you shouldn’t be glamorizing that.

    I’m not glamorizing pimping. In fact I’m non-glamorous myself. I drive a beat up car and don’t wear fancy clothes. Most of the pimps you see in the links I provided were all about image. It’s the media, celebrities, and other role models that glamorize everything. Pimps can do that as well. Like Georgeous Dre said: You need to look like a million dollars in order to attract a million dollars. That is what whores do to catch a trick’s eye.

    Pimps do what they want because they are the boss. Many whores don’t know how to manage their own lives and come from broken homes or are runaways or messed up with drugs. A real respectable pimp would provide for a whore and have genuine concern about her well-being. To me my style is like the way most state laws have employment. Employment at will – free to quit anytime, free to terminate employment anytime.

    Sal, on May 13th, 2008 at 10:14 pm Said:

    So what do you “nice” pimps think should be done about the “mean” pimps. Or do you even care? How do you really feel about independent sex workers? Are we a threat? Are we just being strung along on this web site?</blockquote.

    Nice, mean, cruel, cold, suave, cool, gorilla, finesse…now you are talking about different management styles. I can only speak for myself. The only way you could judge my pimping is if you got to witness it or talk to the whores I pimped off of. You know get a second opinion. Check my references.

    I’m a free market anarchist. I believe that people can (and eventually should) be self-empowered to govern their own lives. We don’t need gov’t telling us what is right/wrong because most of time they are wrong. In the case of prostitution I see it as a basic human right. Like George Carlin said: Selling is legal. Fucking is legal. Why is selling fucking illegal?

    A lot of whores are like little children that don’t have any guidance or direction in life. Why do you think pimps are called “daddies”. Its the same way a father raises a child – he has to teach the kid morals and how to interact with the world. Pimps play the role of the father. They should be there for their children and let them make mistakes and learn. Sometimes you gotta use “tough love”, but I couldn’t explain it to you all that well.

  20. I want to add also that we should be seriously looking into our politicians this coming election. I’m a huge Ron Paul supporter, and many people don’t like him. I disagree with his religious views (he’s a christian) and his abortion views (he says abortion is murder), but he is a true freedom fighter in many other ways.

    This interview was not published by ABC news on the airwaves (only on the internet)

    Ron Paul on prostitution, drugs, and gay marriage

    Ron Paul is a small government conservative, and if he were president the Feds wouldn’t be in the business of busting prostitutes and madams. It would be a state issue like in Nevada where certain counties allow prostitution legally.

    So please do me a favor and take a look seriously at Ron Paul. He is the best candidate for our country

    http://ronpaullibrary.org/

  21. Jeanne started out as an escort – I think people forget that. I became friends with Jeanne as I often do now – I run Sex Workers Anonymous and find I personally need the support of other survivors in order to maintain my sanity. I need someone to talk to who believes me about what’s going on – we’ve been through so many crazy things. I also know no other group that exists for us to support us once we decide to quit. I reached out to her when I first heard about the trial through her attorney. That’s often how I make contact. I told her I’d been through pretty much the same – and I was here for her to talk to. We talked regularly – and I was able to help “warn” her about some of the common tactics our government uses against madams in these cases. Sadly I also warned her that I felt she might be killed for taking the road she took. Very few people knew Jeanne personally – and out of those who did – we all agree she did not kill herself. I guarantee complete confidentiality to everyone who talks to me – so while I knew her – nothing we talked about was revealed to anyone. Even if she had just died – I don’t think I would have either. But I feel her murder deserves an investigation. Jeanne knew she was risking death by what she was trying to accomplish with her trial – and she took that risk to try and make a point for all of us. For that reason – she deserves at least a proper investigation of her death. I mean did anyone hear about fingerprint dusting of the shed door for example? See if anyone else showed up besides her or her mom’s prints? Jeanne loved her mom deeply and would not have had her mother be the one to find her – and not without a real note of explanation. Like most of us – when in court her mom was the only one by her side. Her mom at first said what she felt – it wasn’t suicide. But then she realized she was old and alone – and couldn’t just go to Brazil for a year – so now she’s saying it’s suicide to protect herself from harm. Don’t blame her a bit. I forwarded information I had about Jeanne’s death not being murder – and within three days instead of a call from the police asking me questions about her death and who might want her dead – I had five cops and a drug dog show up at my home with a search warrant. After 4 hours of tearing apart my home and not finding anything to arrest me on – they were quite angry. So then they tried to get CPS out to take my kid away from me. CPS laughed and refused. So they then called my landlord and offered to have me thrown out – claiming I had “trashed” his place. He came by and saw it wasn’t – and didn’t understand why the police would like to him about me. Obviously I need to move again before I go on tv about this. Geraldo has offered to let me and another woman who knew Jeanne go on and talk about why we feel a murder investigation is called for. I mean they didn’t even have an autopsy when they announced it was suicide. We as a group need to organize and demand a full investigation so the lone voices like mine aren’t persecuted like I’m coming under attack now. As it is I’m trying right now to raise enough money to move before these cops decide to come back for me. For those of you still working – you should consider if these johns have so much disposible income – they might want to throw a few bucks to groups like ours who are there to help you when everything is lost. Jeanne had everything taken away from her and was living on credit cards during her trial – but we were there for her. People have this mistaken idea that only street prostitutes need support – and well women like her and Brandy Britton prove that isn’t the case. There is just as much pain and danger at any level of this business. If anyone else wants to talk to me – you can always reach me at http://www.sexworkersanonymous.org

  22. Thanks for your story Jody.

    We are headed towards a police state. Government is getting bigger and with technology they can snoop on phone calls, internet traffic, and install keyloggers. After what you just said and what happened to Wayne Madsen (TSA harassed him at the airport) it looks like they are stepping up the intimidation.

    If you seen the movies, Brazil, Running Man, Idiocracy, Children of Men we are heading towards a dystopian future.

    Politicians are the puppets of the people above them in power. I do believe we are headed towards a New World Order. The US is already headed towards merging Canada and Mexico and plans are being made for a new currency the Amero. They are already building the NAFTA superhighway up from Mexico through Kansas City to Canada.

    So gas is already $4 gallon, food prices are going up, and many jobs are being shed. We are already in recession and headed toward hyperinflation depression. Things are gonna get worse, unless there is a revolution to change course.

    I see the dollar collapsing. In Zimbabwe they just released a half billion bank note, and the Fed here is doing the same with the money supply which means higher prices across the board in commodities, and the people who will suffer the most is the poor and middle class.

  23. […] An online memorial was created shortly after her death, and starting on the night of May 12, a 24-hour vigil of remembrance was […]

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