Tangled Trafficking Laws

Young Sook Kim, a cook of about 60, was swept up in a raid on a massage parlor and detained for a month at the Regional Correctional Center in Albuquerque. She was transferred to a privately run detention center in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where she died due to a stunning lack of care.

Though I have no information about this particular massage parlor raid, I have no doubt she was picked up not only as a presumed sex worker but also as a presumed sexual trafficking victim.

And simple immigration cases can end badly (Kim’s case is reported here too).

Contrast rabid law enforcement for immigrants and over-enthusiastic hunts for sexual trafficking victims with this story of authorities routinely ignoring trafficked US teens. Although more cases of teenage exploitation are being prosecuted, there is still a lack of care and support for trafficked teens. They also seem to get far less media attention (and grant money) than immigrants.

And contrast all this with the recent attempts to clamp down on sexual trafficking laws and create trafficking victims out of all sex workers. I think few of us are strong enough to withstand such “care.”

None of this is news. Well, it was, but I forgot that I wanted to post it. So now it’s just food for thought.

5 Responses

  1. […] Tangled Trafficking Laws « Bound, Not Gagged “Contrast rabid law enforcement for immigrants and over-enthusiastic hunts for sexual trafficking victims with this story of authorities routinely ignoring trafficked US teens.” (tags: trafficking sexwork immigration law) […]

  2. While I agree Amanda that most of us are strong enough to withstand such “care,” we should be always mindful that many of our industry workers suffer horrible, unjust consequences due to their immigration status and we should be militant in our actions to stop the raids, arrests and deportation of our Sisters who must cross borders to provide for themselves and their families.
    I was thinking the other day how racist the anti-prostitution/so called “anti-trafficking” forces are to focus their “rescue” on the Asian Sex Workers. That most women choose to do sex work is not acceptable to them regardless of our country of origin but to put forward the stereotype of the “submissive” Asian Sex Worker waiting for their “rescue” is particularly offensive.

  3. Further, we should be militant in our actions to stop the raids, arrests and deportation of all our Brothers and Sisters who must cross borders to provide for themselves and their families.

  4. “I think few of us are strong enough…” So sorry Amanda. I misread your comment. Now I get what you were saying. Again, sorry.

  5. Lisa,

    It’s hard to write ironic statements online and I’m not going to pretend I’m a master (though I keep trying). Still, the current and proposed laws, as well as current actions of authorities, don’t help anyone. The laws need changed and refocused. Action needs to be taken — as you pointed out. And yes, the focus on Asian women as victims is very racist.

    XX

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: