Working the Intersection Of Sex and Power

Lily Burana
writes in the Washington Post today:

Oh, Deborah Jeane, what are we going to do with you?

Yes, you, Deborah Jeane Palfrey — aka Miz Julia, former proprietress of the alleged escort service Pamela Martin and Associates, the 50-year-old California girl who’s had Washington all a-dither.

   

You surrendered your phone records and took your plight to ABC — all in your own defense, of course. Facing racketeering charges and possible prison time, a girl’s gotta do what a girl’s gotta do.

Full Story

3 Responses

  1. This is well-written, although extrememly long! She touches on some good points.

    I agree with this statement:

    “Surely some will respond to the scandal with a call for decriminalizing prostitution — as though that would extinguish this type of conflagration. Hardly. It’s not the legal catch that sparks the embarrassment, titillation and professional fallout. (Trust me, if a politico were caught trolling Craigslist for no-money-exchanged fun, it’d still rock the Hill.)”

    But I feel like she’s being dismissive of the fact that regardless of what happens to these public figures, the people who are continuing to work in the biz are going to be arrested, assaulted, robbed and excluded from the discussion if prostitution continues to be a criminal act.

    It is the sex, not the crime, that has everyone excited. However, decriminalization woiuld mean that two-faced politicians would go down on their own without taking sex workers down with them. Besides, if we weren’t criminals, how would the rich and powerful dis-credit us when they get caught? Oh wait- it’s about the sex, not about the crime- or is it?

    It seems like the media is forging its way toward deeper questions and discussions, but they’re still missing out on many of the ‘Intersections of Sex and Power.’

  2. Is it me, or did Lily misstate the name of Tracy Quan’s book? and if so, bad on her and on the WaPo factchecking team. All in all, an interesting article.

  3. I liked the article, except for one thing. Lily seems to believe that women should take all the heat for actions that require two parties and never name a client.

    I don’t believe in blanket policies of behavior for everyone. The Palfrey case has challenged my beliefs about whether or not to name clients. I understand the point Jeane Palfrey is trying to make.

    Lily, as a stripper, never had to worry about being arrested and having to face the question of what to do about her client list. I wish her article had thought about that issue a little more deeply.

    XX

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