The First Sex Worker to Win an Oscar?

Probably not, and I know lots of people, not just sex workers, have major issues with her, but just for this morning, I want to revel in the words “stripper” and “Oscar winner” on the same front page about the same woman:

Diablo Cody Wins Oscar

8 Responses

  1. It is nice that she won the award for her writing talent.

    XX

  2. I agrree with Amanda. I also agree that it is just awesome that a sex worker accomlished something of such a high stature. Blows those stereotypes out of the water.

  3. It was my youngest daughter who called to tell me that a former stripper (sex worker) wrote the script for Juno. My 18 year old daughter, also a college student, having a mom for a retired hooker, shares our whore pride. Now if we could get young women like my baby girl Jessica to fight the anti-sex/anti-prostitution/anti-pornogrphy forces entrenched in the college campuses, we might have a fightting chance.

  4. I love that she is so open about her sex work, too. Completely unapologetic. Kudos to her! It is a grand day for sex workers- a moment that will go down in history.

    Here is a more in-depth article about her:
    http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/film/article3199604.ece

    Has anyone read Candy Girl? I have it but haven’t read it yet.

    Melissa, what issues do people have with her? I must confess I don’t know that much about her.

  5. I read Candy Girl when it first came out. (I try to collect sex work literature, especially the stripper memoir variety.)

    I didn’t dislike the book, but I also don’t think it’s the greatest in the stripper memoir genre. If I had to recommend my top books in that category, it would be Lily Burana’s Strip City or Elizabeth Eaves’ Bare. But that’s just my personal opinion.

    I was not , however, a reader of her Pussy Ranch blog.

    I’m interested in hearing others’ take on Diablo and Candy Girl.

    Regardless, wouldn’t it be awesome if she were a contributor here?

  6. I thought Candy Girl was an entertaining read. Like Jessica said, not the world’s greatest stripper memoir, but it’s *her* memoir, and the thing I find so interesting is reading different people’s experiences, and noticing the similarities and disparities.

  7. Jessica, funny that you mention Bare… I tried to read it several times, but couldn’t ever get more than halfway through. It wasn’t anything about the storyline itself, but just something about Eaves’ writing style made me want to fall asleep. :\

  8. I felt that the beginning of “Bare” was too drawn out to the point where it got boring to read. However, the second part of the book was a real “page turner” and maintained my interest really well. I think the fact that I was a dancer may have also helped to maintain my interest., and some of the experiences I could relate to…some I couldn’t. Eves provided really good anecdotes f her experiences. However, a major problem I had with the book was that at times, Eves projected her own attitudes toward dancing onto other dancers and disputed the perspectives of dancers if such perspectives were different from hers. The book would have been better if she accepted that there are many realities and perspectives in dancing, and just because some dancers have different perspectives than hers, that doesn’t make the different perspectives any less valid.

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